Faculty

Calvin Morrill

Associate dean for Jurisprudence and Social Policy/Legal Studies, Stefan Riesenfeld Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology

Meet the Faculty

Our esteemed faculty members are not only practicing and working in the fields that they teach, but they also love to teach legal studies. They are committed to your success and take great joy in teaching students from across the globe.

Purushottama Bilimoria

Purushottama Bilimoria

Purushottama Bilimoria is a visiting scholar with the Institute for South Asia Studies at UC Berkeley, and serves as a senior lecturer in the Center for Dharma Studies at Graduate Theological Union (GTU). Bilimoria is also Honorary Research Professor of Philosophy and Comparative Studies at Deakin University and senior fellow at University of Melbourne in Australia (his former home). He has recently served as Shivadasani Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies in Oxford University, and All-India Visiting Professor with the Indian Council of Philosophical Research and India International Centre.

R. Ben Brown

R. Ben Brown

R. Ben Brown is a lecturer with a continuing appointment in the Legal Studies Program at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is also an Affiliated Scholar with the Center for the Study of Law and Society. His research and teaching interests are United States Legal and Constitutional History and the intersection of property rights and liberty rights. He holds a J.D. from Vanderbilt University and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. His dissertation examined the ending of the common property regime of open-range grazing in the Southern United States in the 19th century. His latest article, published in Radical History Review, was "Free Pigs and Free Men: Closing the Southern Range and the American Property Tradition."

Mark Brilliant

Mark Brilliant

Professor Mark Brilliant earned his Ph.D. in history from Stanford University in 2002. He then spent two years at Yale University: the first as a post-doctoral fellow at the Howard R. Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders, and then as a lecturer in the History Department. He came to UC Berkeley in 2004 as an assistant professor in history and American studies. In September 2010, Oxford University Press published his first book, The Color of America Has Changed: How Racial Diversity Shaped Civil Rights Reform in California, 1941-1978, which won the Cromwell Book Prize from the American Society for Legal History and received honorable mention from the Organization of American Historians for the Frederick Jackson Turner Award. He is currently working on a book entitled From School Bus to Google Bus: A New Politics, a New Economy, and the Rise of a New Gilded Age, which examines the relationship between the new (post-industrial, high-technology) economy and the new (post-New Deal, post-Great Society, bipartisan neoliberal) politics from the late 1960s through the late 1980s and how they contributed to the rise of the New (or Second) Gilded Age, as it would come to be known.

Meir Dan-Cohen

Meir Dan-Cohen

Meir Dan-Cohen is the Milo Reese Robbins Professor of Law. He clerked for the Supreme Court of Israel before coming to the United States as a Fulbright Fellow to study at Yale University. He joined the Boalt faculty in 1977 and was also Professor of Law at Columbia University and at Tel-Aviv University.

Lauren Edelman

Lauren Edelman

Lauren B. Edelman is the Agnes Roddy Robb Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology at the UC Berkeley. Before joining the Law School faculty in 1996, she was a member of the sociology and law faculties at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. At UC Berkeley, she served as Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Society and as Chair and Associate Dean for Jurisprudence and Social Policy.

Edelman is the winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship, has twice been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and was a fellow at the Rockefeller Center in Bellagio, Italy. She has served as secretary and president of the Law and Society Association, chaired the Sociology of Law section of the American Sociological Association, and was elected to the Sociological Research Association, an honorary society. Edelman's research addresses the interplay between organizations and their legal environments, focusing on employers' responses to and constructions of civil-rights laws, workers' mobilization of legal rights, the impact of management practices on law and legal institutions, dispute resolution in organizations, school rights, empirical critical race studies, empirical sociolegal studies and employer accommodations of disabilities in the workplace.

Kinch Hoekstra

Kinch Hoekstra

Kinch Hoekstra specializes in the history of political, legal and moral philosophy. He has written on ancient, renaissance and early modern political thought. Kinch has published a number of studies on ancient thought, including “Athenian Democracy and Popular Tyranny” (2016) and “Thucydides and the Politics of Necessity” (2017, with Mark Fisher). Another focus of research has been the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes (including studies of his theory of equality, obligation, democracy, tyranny, mixed government, natural law and the rationality of justice); he co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Hobbes (2016).

Sonia Katyal

Sonia Katyal

Sonia Katyal is the Chancellor's Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology. She joined the Berkeley Law faculty in fall 2015 from Fordham Law School, where she served as the associate dean for research and the Joseph M. McLaughlin Professor of Law. Sonia's scholarly work focuses on the intersection of technology, intellectual property and civil rights (including anti-discrimination, privacy and freedom of speech).

Mallika Kaur

Mallika Kaur

Mallika Kaur is a lawyer and writer who focuses on international human rights with a specialization in gender and minority issues. In India, Kaur has worked on a range of issues including farmer suicides, female feticide, and transitional and transformative justice. In the United States, she has worked on issues including post-9/11 violence, policing practices, political asylum and racial discrimination. Kaur has worked with victim/survivors of gendered violence since 2003, including as a crisis counselor, expert on family violence and as a pro-bono attorney at CORA, a domestic violence agency in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she previously was a Staff Attorney.

Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig holds a Ph.D. and J.D., and is the Executive Director of the Human Rights Center and a lecturer at our School of Law. Alexa also co-founded and directs the Human Rights Investigations Lab, where undergraduate and graduate students train to use online open-source methods to support human rights advocacy and accountability. Alexa administers and is a member of the Technology Advisory Board of the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court, an advisory member of FemTech, and a founding member of the board of advisors for ARCHER, which is a UC Berkeley-established nonprofit that leverages technology to make data-driven investigations accessible, smarter and more scalable.

Christopher Kutz

Christopher Kutz

Christopher Kutz joined the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at UC Berkeley Law School in 1998. Before joining the Berkeley faculty, he clerked for Judge Stephen F. Williams of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Since his appointment at Berkeley, he has been a Visiting Professor at Columbia and Stanford law schools, as well as at Sciences Po University in Paris, France.

Kutz's work focuses on moral, political and legal philosophy, and he has particular interest in the foundations of criminal, international and constitutional law. His book, Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age (Cambridge University Press, 2000), addressed the question of individual moral and legal responsibility for harms brought about through collective and corporate activity. He teaches courses in criminal law, and moral, political and legal philosophy.

Taeku Lee

Taeku Lee

Taeku Lee is Professor of Law in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute at Berkeley, Managing Director of Asian American Decisions, Co-Principal Investigator of the National Asian American Survey, and currently Treasurer and on the Executive Council for the American Political Science Association. Taeku also serves on the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies and the General Social Survey, and sits on the National Advisory Committee for the U.S. Census Bureau.

Jonathan Marshall

Jonathan Marshall

Jonathan Marshall is the director of the Legal Studies Program.

Calvin Morrill

Calvin Morrill

Calvin Morrill is the Associate Dean for Jurisprudence and Social Policy / Legal Studies, Stefan A. Riesenfeld Professor of Law, and Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Before becoming Associate Dean, he served as the Faculty Director and currently serves on the Advisory Committee of the Center for the Study of Law and Society at Berkeley Law. He is Principal Investigator of the Immigrant Entrepreneur Education Project and Co-Principal Investigator of the School Rights Project, and he has served as Secretary on the Board of Trustees of the Law & Society Association. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on legal institutions, sociology of law and organizations, social conflict and culture, and qualitative field methods.

Elizabeth Pacheco-Tejada

Elizabeth Pacheco-Tejada

Elizabeth Tejada is an alumna of San Francisco State University and the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. She specializes in representing communities and families in need. For most of her career, Elizabeth has worked to help communities understand and access the justice system. She has represented individuals, communities and government agencies.

Behnoosh Payvar

Behnoosh Payvar

Behnoosh Payvar is a researcher at Lund University. She received her Ph.D. in collaboration between the University of Tuebingen and Lund University in 2013. She is the author of Space, Culture and the Youth in Iran: Observing Norm Creation Processes at the Artists' House (Palgrave Macmillan 2015). As a guest researcher and lecturer at Tehran University in 2015, she initiated a new series of lectures, courses (B.A., M.A. and Ph.D.-level) and research on "norms, law and society," which took place in cooperation between Lund and Tehran. Her present research is on the interrelations of norms and law in Iran, studying the case of women, work and law. As a visiting scholar, she is working on the field material collected in Tehran during 2015 and 2016 that will culminate in a monograph.

Roy Peled

Roy Peled

Roy Peled is a J.S.D. candidate at the Tel-Aviv University Law School. His research, "Fairness in the Media: Between Rights, Duties and Interests," focuses on identifying legal mechanisms with a potential to promote fairness in the news media. Peled has previously served as an Associate in Law at Columbia Law School in New York, where he taught L.L.M. students and conducted his own research. Peled has published several articles in Israeli, UK and U.S. law journals, focusing on issues of Freedom of Information and Freedom of Speech.

Richard Perry

Richard Perry

Richard Warren Perry is Lecturer-in-Residence and Senior Fellow in Legal Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He has also served as Professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University. Previous appointments include Assistant Professor in Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine (with secondary appointments in Native American Studies, Environmental, and Global Peace and Conflict Studies) and Research Fellow at the Centre de Philosophie du Droit (Louvain, Belgium). Richard has been a Visiting Scholar at the UC Berkeley Center for the Study of Law & Society.

Victoria Plaut

Victoria Plaut

Victoria Plaut, a social and cultural psychologist, joined the Berkeley Law faculty in 2010-2011 from the University of Georgia where she was Assistant Professor of Psychology. She is currently a Professor of Law and Social Science and Director of Culture, Diversity and Intergroup Relations Lab. At Berkeley Law, Victoria's research and classes focus on incorporating empirical psychological research related to issues of diversity and culture into the design of legal institutions and organizations.

Alan Pomerantz

Alan Pomerantz

Alan Pomerantz is a senior counsel in Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP's Real Estate practice and has been a national leader in the legal profession for many years. He has significant experience as the senior member of the deal teams of some of the largest and most complex joint ventures, project developments, acquisitions, public and private financings, and restructurings. His clients include real estate investment advisers, private-equity funds, global investment banks, global asset managers, real estate developers, REITs, pension funds, and other institutional investors and corporations.

Martin Shapiro

Martin Shapiro

Martin Shapiro, Professor of Law (Emeritus) has taught in the political science departments at Harvard and Stanford Universities and at UC Berkeley, UC Irvine and UC San Diego. He joined the Boalt faculty in 1977 and has been a visiting professor at Amherst College, Yale, École des Hautes Études in Paris, Università degli Studi di Milano and the Summer Institute of the European Group for Public Law in Greece. He is a trustee of the Law and Society Association and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Martin has been a Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, and a research scholar at the Institute for Judicial Research in Bologna, Italy.

Bruno Salama

Bruno Salama

Bruno Meyerhof Salama is Professor of Law at the FGV School of Law in São Paulo, Brazil, where he is also a director of the Center for Law, Economics and Governance. He holds a J.S.D. and an LL.M. from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.A. in Economics from the FGV School of Economics at São Paulo, and a LL.B. from the University of São Paulo. He has been a Visiting Professor at Columbia Law School and is currently a Visiting Professor at UC Berkeley School of Law. He is also an arbiter in the Arbitration Chamber of the Brazilian Stock Exchange (CAM). He has served at the Brazilian National Financial System Appeals Council (CRSFN), with administrative jurisdiction over the local Securities and Exchange Commission, Central Bank and Money Laundering Authority. Before joining academia, he practiced law in Brazil with Pinheiro Neto Advogados and in New York with Sullivan & Cromwell LLP. His list of publications includes two books and three edited volumes in Portuguese, as well as numerous articles and book chapters published in Brazil and in the United States on topics related to banking and corporate law, law and economics, and law and development.

Steven Davidoff Solomon

Steven Davidoff Solomon

Professor Steven Davidoff Solomon's research centers on the intersection of law and finance, with a particular focus on corporate law and governance, mergers and acquisitions, and capital markets. In the past four years, four of his law-review articles have been selected as being among the Top 10 articles published in corporate and securities law in their respective years. He has also published in leading peer-reviewed finance and economic journals such as the Journal of Financial Economics and the American Law & Economics Review. He is also a weekly columnist for The New York Times as The Deal Professor, which primarily focuses on corporate issues.

He is regularly involved in major public-company deals and has been an expert witness in litigation involving numerous high-profile transactions. Prior to entering academia, he practiced as a corporate attorney for about nine years with Shearman & Sterling in its New York and London offices, and with Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer in its London office.

Sarah Song

Sarah Song

Sarah Song joined the Berkeley Law faculty in 2007. She is a political theorist with a special interest in issues of democracy, citizenship, immigration and inequality. She teaches courses in political and legal philosophy, citizenship and immigration law, and feminist theory. Song has authored Justice, Gender and the Politics of Multiculturalism (Cambridge University Press, 2007) and Immigration and Democracy. She currently serves as director of the Kadish Center for Morality, Law, & Public Affairs, which together with the Political Science and Philosophy Departments sponsors the weekly Workshop in Law, Philosophy, and Political Theory.

Eric Stover

Eric Stover

Eric Stover is Faculty Director of the Human Rights Center and Adjunct Professor of Law and Public Health at UC Berkeley. Eric has built the Human Rights Center into a premier interdisciplinary research and policy center that is highly regarded nationally and internationally. He is a pioneer in utilizing empirical research methods to address emerging issues in human rights and international humanitarian law. Before coming to Berkeley in 1996, Eric served as the Executive Director of Physicians for Human Rights and the Director of the Science and Human Rights Program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Trina Thompson

Trina Thompson

Judge Trina Thompson has managed a private criminal defense practice from 1991 to 2000, focusing on juvenile, misdemeanor, felony and capital-defense trials, as well as having served as a public defender in Alameda County from 1987 to 1991. Thompson received a B.A. in Legal Studies from the University of California at Berkeley and graduated from UC Berkeley's School of Law. She currently teaches Comparative Ethnic Studies and American Cultures in the Ethnic Studies Department.

Christopher Tomlins

Christopher Tomlins

Christopher Tomlins is Elizabeth J. Boalt Professor of Law. He joined the Berkeley Law faculty in 2014. Trained as a historian at Johns Hopkins University, his teaching career began in 1980 at La Trobe University, Melbourne, where he was successively Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and University Reader in Legal Studies. In 1992, Tomlins joined the research faculty of the American Bar Foundation (Chicago), where he remained until 2009, when he became Chancellor's Professor of Law at the University of California, Irvine. Christopher's primary tie to Berkeley Law is with the Jurisprudence and Social Policy (Ph.D.) program, in which he teaches courses on the history and law of slavery, and on legal history.

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